Novichok on stage: an interview

Earlier this year, London’s HUNCHtheatre announced the debut of a new play about the 2018 novichok poisonings in Salisbury, England. The show, titled To See Salisbury, brings a whimsical view of the event – the knowns and unknowns – to stages in the United Kingdom and the United States. Working in collaboration with Stage RC and expatriate Russian satirist Victor Shenderovich, the show promises to be provocative and insightful.

Lossi 36 Assistant Editor-in-chief Louis Train sat down with HUNCHtheatre co-founders Oliver Bennett and Vladimir Shcherban to ask about their vision, their work, and the questions they don’t know how to answer. Continue reading “Novichok on stage: an interview”

A bridge to the Muslim world? Chechnya’s engagement with the Middle East in historical perspective

On 29 March 2019, Grozny hosted the last panels of the “Islam – Message of Mercy and Peace” conference, organised by the World Muslim League. The event brought in delegations and representatives from 43 countries, including theologians and dignitaries. At … Continue reading A bridge to the Muslim world? Chechnya’s engagement with the Middle East in historical perspective

The cross-border race: A local initiative uniting both sides of the Oder River

This article is the second in a series of articles written by the graduates of 2018’s Solidarity Academy and re-published in collaboration with Lossi 36. Solidarity Academy is an international project aimed at inspiring and supporting the development of the young intellectuals … Continue reading The cross-border race: A local initiative uniting both sides of the Oder River

Where did all the men go? How Tajik migrants make their home country go around

This article is part of a collaboration between The Perspective Webzine and Lossi 36. The Perspective Webzine is a student based web magazine created and led by Lund University’s Association of Foreign Affairs (UPF).  Should you ever find yourself venturing into the … Continue reading Where did all the men go? How Tajik migrants make their home country go around